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Who is Liable for Some of the Most Common Types of Motorcycle Accidents?

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Motorcycle accidents can happen for many different reasons, and different parties may be at fault. In some cases, motorcyclists bear some or all responsibility for the crash, but more often another motorist is responsible for the collision. Much too frequently, car or truck drivers fail to check their blind spots and change lanes into a motorcyclist, or stopped drivers quickly open their car doors and “door” a motorcyclist who is traveling in the closest lane. Many motorcycle crashes also happen when another driver is distracted or intoxicated or drowsy.

If you were involved in a motorcycle accident caused by another motorist or another party in or around Marietta, it is essential to learn more about your options for filing a claim for compensation by speaking with a Marietta motorcycle accident attorney. In the meantime, we want to tell you more about common types of motorcycle accidents listed by RideApart and who may be liable in these types of collisions.

Motorist Makes a Left Turn in Front of a Motorcyclist at an Intersection 

Left-turn accidents are much more common than they should be, and they can happen as a result of many different types of driver error. In some cases, a driver is not paying attention due to a distraction like talking or texting on a cell phone and simply fails to see the motorcyclist. In other situations, a motorcyclist may be in the driver’s blind spot. And in yet other scenarios still, the driver may improperly estimate the motorcyclist’s speed and may attempt to make a left turn. In all of these situations, another motorist will usually be at fault. The motorcyclist may be able to file an insurance claim for compensation, and if that is insufficient, the motorcyclist may be able to file a lawsuit against the negligent driver.

Slick or Uneven Roadway Leads to a Single-Vehicle Collision 

Motorcyclists can be at serious risk of injury in a single-vehicle collision when they hit a patch of slick or bump road, including a graveled roadway. Depending upon the specific facts of the situation, it could be possible to file a premises liability claim. However, if there was signage warning of the dangerous road condition, it may be difficult for the motorcyclist to obtain compensation by filing a lawsuit. It is important to seek advice from an experienced motorcycle accident attorney.

Car Changes Lanes Into a Motorcyclist 

This is an extremely common type of motorcycle accident, and it usually occurs when a motorcyclist is in a driver’s blind spot. However, even if a motorcyclist is in the driver’s blind spot, the driver can still be liable for an accident.

Rear-End Collisions Involving a Motorcyclist and an Automobile 

In an ordinary rear-end collision involving two automobiles traveling at low speeds, injuries may be minimal. However, when an accident like this happens and a motorcyclist is struck from behind, that motorcyclist can be thrown from the bike and can sustain life-threatening or fatal injuries. In nearly all rear-end collisions of this type, the driver who struck the motorcyclist from behind will be liable.

Contact a Marietta Motorcycle Accident Attorney Today 

Do you have questions about seeking compensation after a motorcycle accident? An experienced Marietta motorcycle accident lawyer can assist you. Contact The Strickland Firm to learn more about our personal injury services.

Resource:

rideapart.com/articles/254912/10-common-motorcycle-accidents-and-how-to-avoid-them/

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